retail

Kobo for booksellers

On this page you will find a variety of tools for training purposes. The documents detail the unique selling points of Kobo devices and also contain helpful comparisons to other eReaders, including the Kindle. This information will help you effectively retail Kobo devices to a range of customers. 


Accessories
We do recommend actively selling the accessories at the point of purchase. It is often quite simple to sell a cover for a Kobo device in the same purchase. Get your staff in to the habit of offering the covers to customers when they are shopping for devices. Each store should be expecting to sell a cover with approx 80% of devices sold.

Bookseller Training Videos
These videos function as great dummies guides. They take you through everything from opening the box to charging up the device for the first time. A good resource for the complete luddite.

Getting help with Kobo
Kobo has a customer care team who can help with any questions you might have.


Kobo Glo Unboxing...

 

Product Information

These documents have been prepared by Kobo and contain all your need to know information to train staff on how to sell Kobo devices.

The word documents break the info on the Glo and Mini down into 3-5 key points.

Kobo Glo retail selling points (opens to Word)
Kobo Aura H2O retail selling points (opens to Word)
 

Kobo Returns Process

DOA Period (within 30 Days of purchase)

Customer returns device to place of purchase
Place of purchase replaces faulty device for customer
Place of purchase requests RA from Synnex for full credit

Warranty Period (outside 30 Days of purchase)

Customer contacts Kobo Customer Care on 00800-3322-3344
Kobo assess customer unit for fault
Kobo issues an RMA for faulty unit to Customer
Customer mails unit to Kobo
Kobo replaces unit with 4 days via post

#eFairnessNZ – closing the GST loophole


New Zealand is currently seriously disadvantaged by a loophole that means that people do not pay GST or duty on low-value purchases (generally goods less than $400 in value) when they buy from foreign websites. This creates a reverse tariff which unfairly discriminates against Kiwi retailers. Booksellers NZ are working hard alongside Retail NZ to level the playing field for local retailers including our membership bookstores.  
 
Booksellers NZ firmly believes it is the responsibility of parliament to ensure GST is a universal tax by requiring all retailers – whether they operate online, in bricks-and-mortar stores, or a combination of both – to fulfil their obligation to collect sales tax.
 
This is neither a new tax nor special treatment for independent bookstores – it is an equitable and consistent enforcement of existing GST laws. 
 
Locally owned businesses have far greater positive economic impact on their communities and are largely responsible for our communities retaining their unique characteristics. The Here’s what you just did flier lists 10 ways that your customers contribute to the infrastructure of their community by shopping locally. The current de minimis threshold enables offshore online retailers a 15 percent competitive edge over local businesses and contributes nothing to the sustainability of the New Zealand economy. 
 
The Government is missing out on at least $200 million a year in revenue from low value goods, not counting GST that would otherwise be paid on cross-border services and digital downloads delivered into New Zealand. That's a huge amount of tax money!
What is GST Fairness? (Also called eFairness)
 
E-Fairness, or sales tax fairness, calls for the equitable enforcement of GST as a universal tax. Currently, bricks-and-mortar retailers are required to collect and remit sales tax on customer purchases, while offshore online retailers are allowed to sell customers the same products with no responsibility to collect GST if it falls below the existing de minimis threshold. This places local retailers at a severe disadvantage and has prompted Booksellers NZ to act on behalf of our members.
 
Booksellers NZ and Retail NZ #eFairnessNZ campaign 
 
In April 2015 Retail NZ and Booksellers NZ are launching a #eFairnessNZ campaign to encourage the government to take urgent action to close the existing de minimis loophole – and we need your help. 
 
What can booksellers do?
 
Write to your local MP and let them know that you support eFairness in New Zealand: tell them how the existing GST loop hole is impairing the progress of your store and the financial and cultural well-being of your local community. We have also supplied a helpful list matching local bookstores to their local MP's. (Please note this list is as accurate and up to date as possible but may contain some errors.)
 
Booksellers NZ have provided the eFairness Action Kit to make this outreach easier.
 

E-Fairness Action Kit

What does Government need to do?
  • Require overseas companies to register for GST, and collect the tax just like any other retailer does.
  • Introduce a lower threshold for low value goods or abolish the threshold - where GST and duty has not been pre-paid, this should be collected at the border before the items are released.
  • Levy a fee on goods worth more than $25 to cover the cost of Customs and quarantine clearance, as happens in most other countries.
Key things to know
  • New Zealand is out of step with most other countries.
  • Canada has a CAD 20 threshold and the UK has a GBP 15 threshold. Tax is collected on all imports over these levels, as well as a fee to cover the costs of Customs clearance.
  • The Government is missing out on huge amounts of revenue as a result of the current loophole – enough to fund at least 4,345 new first-year primary teachers or more than 9,000 hip replacements.
  • The current loophole makes it hard for Kiwi retailers to compete with foreign websites that don't contribute to New Zealand.
  • The Government is looking at this issue through the OECD but most countries already charge tax on low value items crossing the border. The Government can and should take urgent action to close the loophole.
How can you help?
  • Please write urgently to your local MP. Please let them know how this issue is impacting your business and your community and what it would mean for your business and employees if the loophole was fixed. Booksellers NZ have provided an MP letter template on our website. Adjust this template to suit your store and your local MP.
  • Please use social media to tell the world about the impacts on your business. Use the #eFairnessNZ hashtag to tell your story.
  • Please tell your customers about how important it is to allow New Zealand stores to survive in a competitive world.
  • Check out the media links, template letters, submissions and other handy tools that Retail NZ have provided on their website to help engage your customers and communities in the debate: www.retail.kiwi/eFairnessNZ
  • Add your signature to the online community of people supporting changehttp://goo.gl/vfA8FY
What can the Government buy with $200 million?  
  • 4,345 new first-year primary school teachers
  • 9,091 hip replacements
  • six Radio New Zealands
  • 1,484 backbench MP salaries
  • 396,747 weeks of paid parental leave
Resources for bookstores
  • Local MP Letter Template: Click through, or find this in the list of file attachments below
  • Local Press Release TemplateClick through, or find this in the list of file attachments below
  • Find Your Local MP: We have created a document that lists local and MPs and their addresses and matches them to the relevant membership bookstores. Please note this list is as accurate and up to date as possible but could contain some errors.  
 
#eFairnessNZ Logos
Other links
 
For more information, contact: lincoln.gould@booksellers.co.nz, tel 04 472 1908

Australia to reduce GST de minimis to zero?

Federal Government and State Treasurers expect to eliminate GST Low Value Threshold on offshore retail purchases
 
On Friday morning State Treasurers will be meeting with Federal Treasurer Joe Hockey to discuss reform to the GST. It is being widely reported that the Federal Government and State Treasurers will agree to eliminate the Low Value Threshold on online offshore purchases – bringing tax fairness to the collection of GST.
 

Hot topics, hot property

by Elizabeth Heritage
 
This week, The Read investigates publishing on current affairs and hot-topic issues in Aotearoa: why we do it, how it’s received, and how it sells.
 
To begin with, I spoke to some publishers who are producing these kinds of books: Bridget Williams Books, Potton & Burton, and Awa Press. I also talked to a publisher-distributor, Bateman. I then talked to some booksellers, Marcus Greville at Otago University Books, Juliet Blyth at Vic Books, Hamish Wright at PaperPlus Cambridge, and Carson’s Bookshop. 

Publishing on the big issues

Early reading the focus of Global Education Systems’ Bud-e

Good news, booksellers – noted New Zealand children’s educational publishers Global Education Systems have devised completely new programs and products for early reading for the retail market. Recently launched, the new concept is for both local and major international markets.

The Bude-e system is both low-tech – colourful, brief books – and cutting-edge tech with animated apps that include both storytelling and interactive aspects. The range goes from a large selection of books retailing at $6.99 through to the extensive app with captivating poetry, song, reading and teaching sequences.

Booksellers NZ & Book Tokens (NZ) Ltd Annual Report 2015

ANNUAL REPORT TO MEMBERS OF BOOKSELLERS NZ FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR TO 31 MARCH 2015

FROM THE CHAIR

It has been another variable year for booksellers, we have heard about sales reaching record highs, but some have weathered despondent lows.  This is my third annual report from the Chair and I am heartened by the statistics of late showing an upturn in book sales for the calendar year-to-date of 5.1% by value.  This bodes well for the future of bookselling in New Zealand.  Although there have been more shop closures, we are beginning to hear of stores changing hands which is also encouraging.  Your Association, board and staff continues to work hard on projects which will support member stores.  

E-books are still on our landscape, although sales do not seem to be experiencing the growth they saw two or three years ago.  For those of you engaged in this market, particularly those who are selling devices, there are moves afoot to increase the margins in this area.  We have learned from experience that  these negotiations may take time  but we are confident of a positive outcome.
 
Educating the public to realise that online purchases can be made from kiwi booksellers is finding some degree of success.  Some stores are reporting significant increases in sales from their e-commerce websites.  Their success can generally be contributed to the marketing they do through their websites.  Social media continues to be a significant tool for booksellers in communicating with customers and encouraging them to visit their websites.  These same customers are increasingly mobile and those shops that have responsive websites that properly display on mobile devices are a step ahead in this field.
 
Publishing in New Zealand continues to be a ferment of change.  We no longer have a major international publishing house distributing from within this country and there continues to be stress with regard to supply.  However, the New Zealand open market is helpful in enabling booksellers to meet urgent demand.  There has also been a considerable increase in the number and capability of home grown publishers and the development of quality self-published books. 
 
The momentum for change to overcome unfair competition from foreign online booksellers that are not required to collect GST is progressing well.  The government is at least changing its language and indicating that it is a problem which must be fixed.  More though needs to be done and we are seeking a firm commitment and timetable from government to close the loophole.  It is important that our members assist in putting pressure on Parliament to make the necessary changes. The CEO and management team have been diligently working on this behind the scenes, continuing to make contacts in government and presenting our case.  Your Association along with Retail NZ have developed the #eFairnessNZ campaign that all of you will have received information about and templates to enable you to act on.  This campaign depends heavily on your commitment.  The more lobbying that we can do of our local MPs, the more chance we have of change.  We need to create a stir in our local electorates and encourage our representatives to talk about this issue at higher levels.  Please do not assume that someone else will effect change.  Online buying from foreign sellers impacts each and every one of us and we owe it to ourselves and our businesses to participate in the e-fairness campaign.  Supply chain and pricing issues have not been forgotten, but unfortunately little progress has been made.
 
Booksellers NZ gift cards continue to be a success.  The number of third party outlets selling them has increased and the revenue to the Association from unredeemed cards has been higher than anticipated.  While Book Tokens still remain available, sales continue to decrease.
 
Despite best efforts, NZ Book Month is no longer viable.  No sponsor was forthcoming and even between the stakeholders, funding for a shorter, week-long promotion could not be raised.  However, planning is well underway for a New Zealand Bookshop Day on October 31st.  There will be some centrally co-ordinated promotion, but members are encouraged to think outside the square for this national promotion and get local media involved in celebrating bookselling and reading in New Zealand.
 
Two young booksellers attended the ABA Winter Institute in Asheville, North Carolina in February.  As with last year’s scholars, they found the experience to be rewarding.  We are pleased to announce that once again Kobo have come on board as sponsors, an arrangement that is in place for three years.  The announcement of the recipients of the 2016 Kobo Scholarship will be made at Conference.
 
The formation of the Book Awards Trust has been completed, but this was the only good news regarding the Awards.  Despite an extensive effort, no sponsor could be obtained for either set of awards.  Your Board felt that the Book Awards for Children and Young Adults could not disappear off the horizon, it having the stronger commercial impact of the two, so Book Tokens Ltd provided sponsorship for this year which has been supplemented from others close to the book industry.  The Book Tokens sponsorship will be reviewed by the Board after this year’s awards, but the search for other sponsors continues.  There will be no “adult” awards in 2015, but they have been aligned with the Auckland Writers Festival in 2016 as a fringe event and will include books published in the 2014/15 year.
 
As partners with the Publishers Association in the Book Trade Liaison Committee (BTLC), we have been involved with the revamping of the Book Trade Industry Awards.  The idea was to increase the prestige and significance of these awards.  The research and development took longer than anticipated, hence a last minute rush about which some of you have commented.  The inaugural awards under this new structure will be presented at Conference.  We hope that you will support those who have entered and join them in celebrating bookselling and publishing in New Zealand.
Financially, BSNZ made a group surplus of $473,674 before tax. This is $331,360 more than last year’s surplus before tax of $142,314.  This year’s larger surplus is due to no further Gift Card start-up costs, an increase in the token pool write back to profit and a good performance from our GMI investment fund reflected in the gain in market value of investments of $209,147.  All tax losses have now been used up by previous years’ operating surplus, so we are now paying income tax - this year the amount payable being $123,519.
 
We are making a concentrated effort to focus on membership this year - to improve services for existing members as well as increase membership.  You will have received an updated handbook describing the support and services that you can receive through your membership.  Be sure to acquaint yourselves with these and take advantage of them.  The management team continually strives to find products and services that can help you in the running of your businesses, be it an advice service or something that will directly save you money.  We still depend on your feedback though and need you to tell us what you expect of the Board and the Association.  Working together is the way to strengthen the Association and the industry and enable a better, more positive future.
 
As an Association we are lucky to have the office team that we do.  Unfortunately we had to undertake some restructuring last year which meant the loss of one position, but the remaining staff put in a sterling effort.  Without them we could not function.  Lincoln and his staff continue to support both the Members and the Board with sound advice and phenomenal work.  I would like to once again acknowledge and thank them for their hard work and loyalty, and their cheerful, helpful and positive outlooks.
 
I also appreciate the commitment and support that my fellow directors have shown and I would like to take this opportunity to thank them for their fantastic efforts over what has at times been a trying year.  I know that it is often thankless role, but it’s absolutely necessary and I hope that all the directors have found it to be as rewarding as I have.
 
 
Kind regards

Mary Sangster
Chair of Booksellers New Zealand & Book Tokens (NZ) Ltd

Read the 2015 Annual Report below

International Publishing Trends & what they mean for booksellers

Publishers and booksellers talk to each other a lot, and that’s good. Last week The Read had the chance to join the Publishers Association of NZ International Summit in Auckland and hear the recent achievements and future plans of Australian company Scribe Publishing’s Henry Rosenbloom and the UK’s Will Atkinson of Atlantic Books. 
 
Currently, both are relatively small publishers, but both men are entrepreneurial and determined on international growth. Rosenbloom has even ‘taken the coal to Newcastle’ by opening an office for Scribe in London!
 

Get on board with the #eFairnessNZ Campaign

This week, Booksellers NZ and Retail NZ launched an #eFairnessNZ campaign to encourage parliament to close the existing GST loophole which allows some low value goods to be imported free of GST and duty. Currently, retailers across New Zealand face a 15% disadvantage in their terms of trade before they open their doors to customers each day, because offshore online retailers are allowed to import goods worth up to $400 into the country without a requirement to pay GST – the so-called universal tax. Retail NZ and Booksellers NZ are calling this a matter of eFairness.
 

eFairnessNZ Action Kit

E-Fairness Action Kit

What does Government need to do?
  • Require overseas companies to register for GST, and collect the tax just like any other retailer does.
  • Introduce a lower threshold for low value goods or abolish the threshold - where GST and duty has not been pre-paid, this should be collected at the border before the items are released.
  • Levy a fee on goods worth more than $25 to cover the cost of Customs and quarantine clearance, as happens in most other countries.
Key things to know
  • New Zealand is out of step with most other countries.
  • Canada has a CAD 20 threshold and the UK has a GBP 15 threshold. Tax is collected on all imports over these levels, as well as a fee to cover the costs of Customs clearance.
  • The Government is missing out on huge amounts of revenue as a result of the current loophole – enough to fund at least 4,345 new first-year primary teachers or more than 9,000 hip replacements.
  • The current loophole makes it hard for Kiwi retailers to compete with foreign websites that don't contribute to New Zealand.
  • The Government is looking at this issue through the OECD but most countries already charge tax on low value items crossing the border. The Government can and should take urgent action to close the loophole.
How can you help?
  • Please write urgently to your local MP. Please let them know how this issue is impacting your business and your community and what it would mean for your business and employees if the loophole was fixed. Booksellers NZ have provided an MP letter template on our website. Adjust this template to suit your store and your local MP.
  • Please use social media to tell the world about the impacts on your business. Use the #eFairnessNZ hashtag to tell your story.
  • Please tell your customers about how important it is to allow New Zealand stores to survive in a competitive world.
  • Check out the media links, template letters, submissions and other handy tools that Retail NZ have provided on their website to help engage your customers and communities in the debate: www.retail.kiwi/eFairnessNZ
  • Add your signature to the online community of people supporting changehttp://goo.gl/vfA8FY
What can the Government buy with $200 million?  
  • 4,345 new first-year primary school teachers
  • 9,091 hip replacements
  • six Radio New Zealands
  • 1,484 backbench MP salaries
  • 396,747 weeks of paid parental leave
Resources for bookstores
 
#eFairnessNZ Logos
Other links
 
A Proposed Pathway towards future reform of New Zealands de minimis threshold (March 2013 NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation paper)
E-Commerce and its effect upon the Retail Industry and Government Revenue (2013 NZ Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation paper)
 
For more information, contact: lincoln.gould@booksellers.co.nz, tel 04 472 1908

#eFairnessNZ campaign seeks urgent action on tax loophole

Retail NZ and Booksellers NZ have today launched an #eFairnessNZ campaign to close a loophole which allows some low value goods to be imported free of GST and duty. The launch of the campaign follows comments by the Prime Minister last month that New Zealanders are prepared to pay their fair share of GST and duty, and that the current rules create an "unfair disadvantage for New Zealand retailers".